This article was originally published on Metro.us.

BY ROB WONDERLING

The Greater Philadelphia region is positioned to be a leader of the next stage of disruption in healthcare.

The Greater Philadelphia region has always been a hub for the life sciences. This hub was established hundreds of years ago with the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. In 1765, it stood as the first and only medical school in the original 13 colonies of our country. In Surgeon Hall on Fifth and Walnut streets, the young and curious minds of some of the first American-taught doctors sat in on lectures, learning about the human anatomy.

Philadelphia is still making great strides in life sciences over three hundred years later with an ever-growing healthcare sector. Today, over eighty percent of U.S. pharmaceutical and biotech companies have a presence in the Delaware, New Jersey and Pennsylvania Northeast corridor.

The Greater Philadelphia region is positioned to be a leader of the next stage of disruption in healthcare as a result of its top biomedical programs, world-renowned research institutions and a healthy ecosystem of investment activity and enterprises of all sizes. There are over 1,200 life science establishments, seven medical schools, $1 billion in National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding, $6.3 billion in investment in regional companies, and 48,900 direct life sciences jobs in the 11-county region.

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